03
October
2016

Goetheanism at Emerson: new seeds this autumn

Written by Philip Kilner (Goethean Science Tutor)

A series of five Saturday morning workshops and a symposium in Goethean Science are starting very soon.

Goetheanism at Emerson: new seeds this autumn

Many of you will have heard the sad news of Robert Lord’s passing in September, a week before his 70th birthday. One of Robert and Angela’s initiatives, after playing key roles in saving Emerson College from bankruptcy and disintegration, was the establishment over the last three years of a three-month course in Goetheanism: a course that integrated scientific and artistic approaches to nature.

I was only able to join two of its Saturday morning workshops last year. Knowing that I planned to retire, partially at least, from my full-time work in a London hospital, Robert had asked me to give a series of seminars in this autumn’s course. I was looking forward to being part of it, so it’s been a real disappointment to me that Robert and Angela can’t continue as course carriers, although I understand that Angela is continuing to run her Columbine Art Acadamy. Nevertheless, some seeds of their Goetheanism initiative are being nurtured at Emerson. A series of five Saturday morning workshops and a symposium in Goethean Science are starting very soon. They are now advertised and open for registration in the Courses and the Events sections of the Emerson website . 

A Goethean approach to science, including the rightful reintegration scientific and artistic approaches, has been pivotal in my own career. I was introduced to Goetheanism through Jochen Bockemuehl in 1976, when he was leader of the Natural Science Section in Dornach. Then, in 1979-80, I studied sculpture and flow at Emerson with John Wilkes and his newly arrived young colleague, Rudolf. Although I had previously qualified in medicine, it was through these courses that I found my way into an enterprise that I could fully identify with: inquiry into the forms, flows and movements of our blood circulation and heart. I won’t go into this here; anyone interested will be welcome to join in.

More details on the Goethean Science syllabus can be found here.

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